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What XP11 / XP12 aircraft are the most study-level?


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I think we all know the answer to most of these questions; I'm going to pose them anyway.

Part 60 - Private Pilot aircraft - (Generally low & slow - $100 hambuger flights)

Part 90 - Private owned aircraft - (Owner hire and pays a commercial pilot)

Part 135 - Charter operations aircraft - (Mostly aircraft that carry at least 12 passengers - highly regulated by FAA)

Part 121 - Airline operations aircraft - (Scheduled flights offered to the public, i.e. Southwest Airlines)

My question is, in each category which X-Plane 11/12 aircraft do you consider the MOST study-level?

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I've heard that only a fool has a conversation with himself. At the risk of sounding foolish here's my answers to the questions:

Part 60 - Piper Arrow III/V (P28R) - Justflight (It's one of my favorites - maybe not so study-level)

Part 90 - TBM900 - Hotstart

Part 135 - Challenger 65 - Hotstart (I haven't actually flown this but, WOW!)

Part 121 - 737 ZIBO (Haven't flown this one either - but I've heard a lot about it.)

You might have a different list.

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  • 4 weeks later...

It would be nice if there was more than 2 users on this forum eh?

I only know enough to say which Cessna 170 I consider most study level, and for that (Part 60 I guess if you're in the USA, who cares about the FAA if you are canadian or european though), I would go with AIrFoil Labs, which has a 172 steam gauge and 172 glass cockpit (garmins).

 

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Hi Initiated. It would be nice, especially given the view count to get more participation. I'm glad you chimed in 'cause this isn't my personal blog.:)

You know, I hadn't thought about that - that the FAA is only a US regulatory agency. They have so much sway in the US that they almost feels globally. Or perhaps it feels that way because I fly (virtually) 98% of my flight in the US. I really should expand my horizon. I never considered CAA, etc.

I have both AFL Cessna's and love them both. After all, it is one of the only aircraft I ever flew IRL - when I was seeking a PPL.

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I don't know anything about those FAA parts (I'm EASA regulated :ph34r:), and "study level" can really mean anything and nothing. I mean, as an example, is it important to simulate fuel sampling and oil quantity checks on a small piston aircraft, 'cause that's what pilots have to do in reality? Or is your focus on flight dynamics and avionics? Where to draw the line? I went with a selection of aircraft that I consider "study level" because they require studying how the real thing works, and are also built in a somewhat instructive way. I would never consider a model "study level" if it doesn't come with documentation (or documentation is otherwise publicly available) - how should I study if I can't find the required documents (POH, FCOM, FCTM, ...)?

I'm trying to match your set of categories with my favorites:

Small aircraft for private pilots and flight schools:

  • The AirFoilLabs Cessna 172 NG makes an excellent model for flight students - though I'm still waiting for the analog panel they announced
  • The Torquesim Cirrus SR22 is IMO the best high power piston aircraft model out there - particularly the version with Entegra avionics is superb. Personally, I prefer the TN over the normally aspirated engine, since managing a TN engine correctly (which TS models pretty accurately) IMO is a great experience and additional stuff to learn.

Light twins (multi-engine trainers and hobbyists):

  • IMO not covered. There's a load of excellent models out there (Aerobask's DA62, Torquesim's Islander), but I wouldn't categorize them as study level.

Medium sized aircraft for charter ops or corporate transport:

  • The TOGA Mitsubishi Mu-2B Marquise (v2) is my favorite turboprop - it's a quirky beast, so IMO a lot more interesting than the "boring" TBM (though that's an excellent aircraft model as well, just not as exciting as the Moo). You can learn a bunch about roll control and roll trim flying this aircraft, and it will savagely punish pilots flying uncoordinated turns.

Light business jets

  • IMO not covered yet by something deserving the term "study level". I suppose TS will change that with their Citation II, but it's not available yet

Heavy business jets

  • HotStart Challenger 650, no doubt. It might get a strong contender with the upcoming Aerobask Falcon 8x, but absolutely not sure there.

Airliners

  • IMO none atm. Many models out there get certain aspects right, but I don't see a model that actually integrates all aspects properly. As a compromise, I'll list my favorite airliners which I consider close to study level:
    • Regional: FlyJSim Dash-8 Q400
    • Domestic: ToLISS Airbus A321
    • Twin Aisle: iniSimulations Airbus A300
    • Intercontinental: Felis Boeing 747-200
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It's official, no doubt about it. You guys certainly make me smarter.

@daemotron You have broadened my definition of study-level. I can certainly concur that after flying the Moo and the CL650, these Devs are redefining the term for the entire community. I haven't been following Aerobask's development of the Falcon but if it's anywhere close to the Challenger then I may find myself limiting my flights to those 3 aircraft. Seriously though, as you said there are just too many great aircraft to only flight those they are the cream of the crop.

Regarding the airliners, some of my online friends have twisted my arm and convinced my to try an Airbus in the "other" sim  game for group flights.

Merci,
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On 8/26/2022 at 12:58 PM, VirtualGAaviator said:

I think we all know the answer to most of these questions; I'm going to pose them anyway.

Part 60 - Private Pilot aircraft - (Generally low & slow - $100 hambuger flights)

Part 90 - Private owned aircraft - (Owner hire and pays a commercial pilot)

Part 135 - Charter operations aircraft - (Mostly aircraft that carry at least 12 passengers - highly regulated by FAA)

Part 121 - Airline operations aircraft - (Scheduled flights offered to the public, i.e. Southwest Airlines)

My question is, in each category which X-Plane 11/12 aircraft do you consider the MOST study-level?

I'm a touch confused - did you mean 61 and 91, or are you referring to a non-US country's aviation regulations? Part 60 is about flight simulator training devices, and Part 90 doesn't exist as far as I understand. Part 61 is about flight instruction, and Part 91 is general aviation.

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