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IXEG 737-300 taxi too fast when on ground


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I'm not sure whether this topic has been discussed and resolved before, but it definitely baffles me quite a lot for some time. As the title says, IXEG 737 taxis too fast when on ground even though the throttle is at idle. If I just let the aircraft go without braking quite a lot, the taxi speed could easily exceed 20, it just keeps going up and up. I need to brake when trying slow the speed. By the way, I don't have any flying equipment , just mouse and keyboard. All  I hope to do is  control the speed on ground. But it usually goes like this, Ground speed goes up to 20or more when I loose the brake. I believe when the throttle is at idle, the aircraft should stay where it is. When I push the throttle lever a little bit forward, the aircraft move forward. That should be logical and reasonable.

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Edited by jimmyshieh
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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Litjan said:

Hi,

I have flown the 737 as a first Officer and Captain for ten years. What you are describing is exactly what the real plane does :lol:.

Happy taxiing, Jan

 

Really ? That is soemthing, thank you. I am enlightened. But it is not easy to control anyway. Is there a parameter I could edit to slow the aircraft?

Edited by jimmyshieh
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We put in considerably effort to make this plane as realistic as possible - not as easy as possible :-)

There are some techniques that real pilots use to control their speed, the main one is to use the brakes (who would have thought?) - use the brakes to slow down to 10 knots, then let the aircraft accelerate to 25, then slow it down again.

Using the reverse thrust is not recommended in the real aircraft, it can kick up small stones and sand and then ingest that debris, which could damage the fanblades.

Also heavier aircraft (around 55.000kgs) tend to not accelerate so much or even not at all.

Cheers, Jan

Edited by Litjan
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13 hours ago, Litjan said:

We put in considerably effort to make this plane as realistic as possible - not as easy as possible :-)

There are some techniques that real pilots use to control their speed, the main one is to use the brakes (who would have thought?) - use the brakes to slow down to 10 knots, then let the aircraft accelerate to 25, then slow it down again.

Using the reverse thrust is not recommended in the real aircraft, it can kick up small stones and sand and then ingest that debris, which could damage the fanblades.

Also heavier aircraft (around 55.000kgs) tend to not accelerate so much or even not at all.

Cheers, Jan

I am convinced by what you said. Thank you

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  • 3 months later...
On 3/16/2021 at 7:53 PM, Litjan said:

We put in considerably effort to make this plane as realistic as possible - not as easy as possible :-)

There are some techniques that real pilots use to control their speed, the main one is to use the brakes (who would have thought?) - use the brakes to slow down to 10 knots, then let the aircraft accelerate to 25, then slow it down again.

Using the reverse thrust is not recommended in the real aircraft, it can kick up small stones and sand and then ingest that debris, which could damage the fanblades.

Also heavier aircraft (around 55.000kgs) tend to not accelerate so much or even not at all.

Cheers, Jan

I came here to ask about this but since its already asked..i would just add to it. Its too difficult to taxi after landing when all the fuel is almost burnt. I brake a lot even then it accelerates too fast from 0 to 30 knots!! Its almost too difficult to taxi this on ground!! turns and all it just needs a complete full stop! I cant believe this is how the real aircraft is! Thats too much of an overpowered engine then!

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When the airplane is very light, it will naturally have less rolling friction and will accelerate the most with idle thrust. Make sure that your throttle is fully at idle, though (sometimes hardware is not calibrated properly).

N1 at idle thrust should be about 21%.

A real 737 at idle thrust and light weight will easily accelerate to 60 or more knots...

Cheers, Jan

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
37 minutes ago, CaptainIcelandair said:

Thats amazing! :D

The good thing is - the 737 Classic does not have any brake temperature indication ;). On the A320s I fly these days we are not allowed to take off if brakes are warmer than 300C - and this can be a problem when taxiing out for a longer distance. Fortunately we have brake fans on those that we keep running, still when going to runway 25 at EDDS on a warm day with a heavy 321, it can be a problem.

tl;dr: Idle thrust is fairly high on high-bypass engines and most pilots wish it was less...in real life, too.

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