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  1. 15 points

    Version 1.0.1

    211 downloads

    Official paint kit for the Hot Start TBM 900. Created by Goran Matovina and Cullen Chandler (Cessnarox).
  2. 13 points
    So we've been hard at work at implementing a custom icing simulation & rendition. Everything dynamic and done via shaders, of course. Depiction of severe icing encounter. Inboard boot just inflated, so inboard leading edge is flaky as the ice flew off in chunks. Notice the ice isn't just a surface effect, it appreciably increases the thickness of the wing, as there are several inches of packed ice in this image: The jagged leading edge in the following screenshot is due to ice crystal growth. This is what makes the wing stop behaving like a wing and instead gives it the refined aerodynamic qualities of a brick: Any exposed sharp edges and point-like structures are prime ice accumulation space: Including wing leading edges, strakes, exposed antenna housings and flap fairings: While stationary on the ground, ice also tends to accumulate on the fuselage:
  3. 13 points
    Hey guys, I don't mind repeating this in a few forums, probably better to have it in more locations. The quick and dirty is that we took @ 6 years to get the IXEG to minimum release....and in the last year before release, things were difficult and we were unsure when we would make it because the team members still have to pay bills and do their other jobs. As it stands, I got involved in a space startup about 9 months before the 733 came out. I managed to 'stall' my participation in that startup for about 9 months and worked solely on the 733 with no income, living on savings during that time to get the 733 out. Wtihin 3 months of the release of the 733, the startup was in full swing and I was the prime designer for our deliverables to NASA. There was a lot riding on the line, many big groups involved, NASA, ESA, Airbus, Boeing, etc....and I could not back out. Because this project was deadline based, and i was already behind, I've been working at it solid for about 2 years to meet the deliverables...which I recently completed just last week by handing over our hardware to head to the ISS on SpX-15 here in about a month....which is why you've seen two whole posts in as many days from me as I can finally take a breath. My participation in this startup is relegated to this "deliverable phase", by my own volition as my passion is flight simulations.....and while I have loose ends to pick up....documentations and such, I am getting poised to get back into XP dev work. I will say, that the release of XP11 also contriubted to some of the 'wait and see'. It should not be hard to tell from the work we put into the 733 that we are passionate about the small details and its painfully clear to the team the features that are missings...and the good news is that we can't let that go, even if it SEEMS that way due to some lack of activity. I know Morten, Nils and I have been in XP Dev work for oh....maybe 14+ years? We very much appreciate you guys cheering for us and your support and while I apologize for this pause, you can be sure that the 733 will surge ahead in features. -tkyler
  4. 10 points

    Version 1.0.0

    144 downloads

    Livery for the Hot Start TBM 900. N900FZ: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/9086041
  5. 10 points
    It might not seem like it sometimes! Just want to echo some words posted by @skiselkov on the TBM discord channel: "With this update we're concluding release week and barring any massive explosions, we'll be taking a short break from the daily updates. Expect the next update to drop some time at the end of next week or two. We've got stuff planned in the pipeline that'll require more than a day's work, and I'm sure your fingers were starting to bleed from having to type in those login credentials so often. Of course, we're not going away or anything. We'll still be around on Discord & the x-pilot.com forums daily, ready to answer your questions and address your concerns."
  6. 10 points
  7. 9 points
    Hello All, This will serve as a formal forum announcement that we have released the version 1.5.1 update for the Take Command! Saab 340A. All customers who have purchased the Saab 340A up till now have been sent an e-mail by X-Aviation with complete instructions on how to obtain your update. We have made this a very simple process! For those that purchase the Saab 340A from today forward, your purchased download will already be updated to version 1.5.1 for you. This ends support of X-Plane 10 and means this update is ONLY FOR X-PLANE 11! What if I didn't get the update e-mail? If you did not receive your update e-mail don't fret! X-Aviation has updated our system to allow all customers to update with ease, regardless of whether you received an e-mail for the update! Here's what to do: 1. Login to your X-Aviation account here: https://www.x-aviation.com/catalog/account_history.php 2. Find your original Saab 340A download and re-download the file. It will download as the latest version! The following is a list of additions/fixes included: What's New / Changed: X-Plane 10 no longer supported Steering tiller adjustments Stair animation fix Nosewheel deflection adjusted Control surface logic adjusted to prevent surfaces from randomly moving around Angle of yoke roll animation adjusted Changed rudder pedal logic and added toe brakes PBR glass has been adjusted Altitude select is now in increments of 100ft Changed door and parking break logic Adjusted oil pressure warning logic Adjusted avionics switch logic Fixed AIRAC info for Garmin 530 Fixed issue with warped textures on radios when texture compression turned off Added ability to assign both condition levers to one axis ("Prop"). As always, thanks for being a customer with X-Aviation. We appreciate your feedback and support! Enjoy these latest updates, and stay tuned to the forum as we continually announce the latest happenings.
  8. 9 points
    Hi Guys, I'm real world flight instructor, an airplane owner, and flight sim enthusiast for many years. I've been dreaming for a long time for developers to take on depth of real life systems, environmental factors and cost driven maintenance aspects. TBM 900 surprisingly have exceeded any my expectation in this regard! Basically your product draws many simple "eye candy" addon aircraft I own obsolete and uninteresting. 900 is both: educational and challenging to fly (properly), which gives a great purpose of flight simming. Even with some expected bugs during initial release TDM provides an impressive display of addon craftsmanship, and set benchmark for other serious developers. . Keep up a great job and thank you for the excellent product!
  9. 9 points
    Captains, After more than one year of full time development I am pleased to announce the TBM-900 is on short final and will be ready for your hangars this weekend! Releasing Saturday at Midnight Eastern Standard Time (get ready to hit that buy button Friday night!). The TBM-900 is the most complex turboprop aircraft simulation produced for X-Plane to date, and one of the most interactive of all aircraft ever produced up till now. We truly believe this will make for a very exciting experience as you fly through the skies! Because of the complexities of the aircraft, and the fact that text is not always the most fun way to digest information, we will be doing a daily 1 hour livestream video session. Each day we will announce which time it starts, with the first one starting in just a few short hours today at 6:30 pm EST (2230 Zulu). You can watch the livestream by clicking here! (Previously Recorded) A brief run down of the core feature list is here: Heavily multi-threaded systems architecture to leverage performance of modern CPUs with many cores.  Flight model tuned to perform to within a few percent of the real aircraft in the normal flight envelope, including maximum and stall speeds, rate of climb, fuel burn, trim behavior and control feel. Full aircraft state persistence. Every switch, flight control position, fuel state and on-airport position is restored upon reload. Even between reloads, system resources change in real time. The engine and oil cools down slowly between flights, the battery drains, tires slowly deflate, etc. Fine-grained systems model, down to individual sub-components. The always-on failure system realistically responds to wear & tear and overstress for each sub-component based on individual load factors. Over-torque, over-temp, frequent starts, hard landings, operating in FOD-contaminated environments and many more all affect individual sub-component wear & tear and service life. Sub-component wear realistically reflects on aircraft performance. Worn engine parts reduce maximum available power, worn prop reduces top speed, worn tires result in worse grip during ground ops, etc. Aircraft maintenance manager to inspect and repair or replace any damaged sub-component. The maintenance manager tracks per-airframe operating expenses in a realistic manner to show the real cost of operating the aircraft. Airframe manager that allows you to operate multiple simulated airframes, each with their own independently tracked wear & tear, livery selections and custom registration marks applied. Airframes can be automatically synchronized between multiple machines over the network with just a few clicks. This automatically syncs up aircraft position, configuration and wear & tear to simulate multiple users sharing the same physical aircraft. See how your fellow pilots treated the aircraft by checking the maintenance manager and engine trend monitoring outputs.  X-Plane 11 G1000 avionics stack with lots of customizations and overlays to simulate the special extensions in the real TBM900. This includes a custom EICAS, systems synoptic pages and special integration with the extra simulated systems such as the weather radar, TAS, electrics, etc. Integrated Synthetic Vision into the PFD with obstacle display, navigation pathways, airport labels and TAWS-B integration. Integrated live charts display from FAA and Autorouter.aero. Navigraph integration will be available in a future update. Fully custom electrical system. Simulation of all buses, switching behaviors and reconfigurations. Full circuit breaker system, integrated with the X-Plane failure system, so a failed or failing system can pop a breaker. Highly accurate PT6 engine model with realistic startup and operating behavior. Engine lag, secondary fuel flow, ITT evolution, response to auxiliary load and many more fine-grained behaviors. Custom prop governor, with all modes simulated, including electric auto-feather with negative torque sensing. Crew Alerting System integrated into the avionics stack with all annunciations, takeoff/landing inhibits, flight state filters and "corner cases" simulated. Environmental Control System integrated into the custom EICAS. Air conditioning and pressurization respond in real time to environmental factors such as ambient temperature, pressure, available engine bleed air, cabin temperature setting, cabin pressure vessel failures, etc. Custom TAWS-B ground proximity warning system with all annunciations modes, inhibits, real-time impact point prediction and terrain painting up on the MFD to ranges of 200NM. The TAWS-B uses the X-Plane terrain DSF data to construct its database, so it is always "up to date".  GWX 70 weather radar with weather & ground modes and realistic radar return painting. Full simulation of radar beam energy dissipation, signal attenuation when passing through dense weather and vertical cell analysis modes. Terrain mapping accurately paints surface features, including recognizable peaks, valleys and lakes. Supports the X-Plane 11 default atmospheric model as well as xEnviro. GTS 820 Traffic Advisory System (TAS) with aural alerts + visual alerts, the TAS MFD page and compatibility with X-Plane default traffic, PilotEdge, Vatsim and IVAO. Full simulation of the ESI-2000 standby instrument, including all configuration pages, sensor failures, AHRS drift and "roll-over" during extreme maneuvers, realistic battery operation and real-time battery depletion, etc.  Dynamic custom registration mark paiting on the fuselage and instrument panel with support for custom TrueType fonts, colors and positioning. This lets livery painters make a "generic" livery and each pilot apply their own custom registration mark with just the click of a button directly in the simulator. Liveries can specify a custom position and font to optimize the look. Custom sound engine with samples from the real aircraft and accurate modeling of individual engine states and sub-component noises such as fuel pumps, gear pumps, flap actuators, etc.  Now, let's roll onto our first day of systems overview briefs we will be doing up till release day! From the start, we have been focusing on making the aircraft "feel" like a real machine. And if you have dealt with real aircraft, you will know that they can be moody at times. Sometimes the engine starts on the first try, sometimes it just seems to want to drag its feet. Other times, you come up to the aircraft and the battery is strangely low, so you need to sit on the ramp after engine start a bit longer to let it charge up. While working on the core systems model in the TBM900, we have taken a great deal of time to focus on getting this kind "personality" coded into the aircraft. Looking at the above image, a watchful eye can immediately see that the "ITT" display is reading 18 degrees C. But the outside air temperature is just 15 degrees C. That slight discrepancy can be due to a number of factors. It could be a sensor inaccuracy. Or it might be some residual heat from a previous engine run. To provide such minute effects, under the hood the systems simulation actually breaks the engine up into tiny pieces and models heat flow between them. Normally those kinds of details would be inaccessible to the end user, but we have decided to go in the opposite direction. We will not only let you see the system details, we have built-in analysis tools for you to examine systems behavior in real time. All of the fields you see above are clickable and can be displayed like a graph of the last 10 minutes. While flying aircraft, we tend to forget about all the complexity that happens behind the scenes. We push a button and things just happen. But with the analytics screens built into our model, you can get an appreciation of what goes on inside the machine to make things go. Let's go for an engine start. We will skip most of the boring part of the engine start, that is the initial motoring and come right after fuel introduction. You can see that the engine has passed its critical "hot" point around 30% NG, but to help you visualize the engine model, I have brough up the ITT and Turbine temperature graphs. You can immediately see how the turbine temperature lags behind the ITT. That's because the ITT is the temperature of the exhaust gasses, while the turbines themselves contain quite a bit of mass of metal that needs to be heated. As the engine accelerates, you will see a double ITT spike that is very characteristic of the PT6 engine. No other aircraft model that we're aware of reproduces this correctly. The second ITT spike comes because the engine start is actually performed in two steps. The full fuel flow required to start the engine and bring it up to its low idle condition is too great at the low engine speeds. It would simply cause excessive engine temperatures during starting, which would significantly shorten component lifespan. So instead, the PT6 (and many other turbine engines) contains "duplex fuel nozzles". As you can see the fuel nozzle has two circuits, a small primary (darker green) and a larger secondary (lighter green). The primary is rigged with a flow divider valve that is spring-loaded to actuate above a certain fuel pressure. This is calibrated so that once the engine reaches 42% NG, the fuel pressure exceeds the spring tension and opens up the second fuel port and allows more fuel into the engine. In the TBM this manifests as a sudden rise in fuel flow from approximately 18 gallons per hour to 25 gallons per hour. There is also an audible rise in engine acceleration. The observant among you will also no doubt have noticed that the ITT display on the EICAS (Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System) is different from the graph value. The reason for that is rather simple if you think about how real sensors work. The sensor surface itself is a metal stud inserted into the gas flow. As such, it too takes a bit to warm up to the real gas flow temperature. In addition, the sensor is an analog device. There is an analog-to-digital conversion circuit that samples the sensor reading and since real sensor data contains some noise, the sample does input "filtering". In simple terms, it doesn't show the immediate value from the sensor, but instead gradually "filters in" the value sampled into an old reading. This provides output smoothing and a much more stable output value. So always keep in mind that what the aircraft's sensors are showing is probably a couple of seconds old anyway. In the next post tomorrow, we will focus a bit more on avionics and some of the cool features we have developed in that department. Stay tuned, and we look forward to seeing you in the TBM filled skies this weekend!
  10. 9 points
  11. 9 points
    Laying down carpet and rubber mats. Carpeted section in front of the Centre Pedestal hides the panel for the emergency gear extension handle. Clicking on that will move that panel off to the side. And the cockpit seats.
  12. 9 points
  13. 8 points

    Version 2.2.0.VR

    5,993 downloads

    P.180 Avanti II for X-Plane 11 - CURRENT VERSION: 2.2.0.VR (uploaded at: 11:00Z February 25th, 2019) NOW VR COMPATIBLE with the help of SimVRLabs! NEW DOWNLOAD OPTIONS - !!! READ BELOW !!! OPTION 1: If you already have the Avanti or any X-Aviation product (you should already have the Gizmo plugin installed in your X-Plane installation - check for Gizmo.plugin in X-Plane 11/Resources/plugins/ folder) Download only the file : "P_180_Avanti_II.zip". Unzip it in your Aircrafts folder. You are good to go! Enjoy your flight! OPTION 2: You haven't the previous version of the Avanti (2.1.0) or any X-Aviation product. Download both files. Run the "P_180_Avanti_Installer.zip". This will install both Gizmo and the previous version of the Avanti. Then you can replace the previous version with the current. NOTE: If you get a pop window to ask you for login details, you do not have to enter anything, just close the window, and the aircraft will work fine. OFFICIAL SUPPORT: Official Bug tracker: https://bitbucket.org/iliastselios/p180_avanti/issues?status=new&status=open Support Forums: DESCRIPTION: As you might already know this aircraft is based on X-Plane's default P.180 Avanti , originally designed for X-Plane 8, was included in X-Plane 9, and from that point has been overhauled to Avanti II version. This is aircraft is totally FREE! It is a "return" to the X-Plane community that supported us those last 4 years that we exist as a development team! This aircraft main features are: High quality visuals, cockpit all new 3D model and textures, including PBR materials. Simulated: a. startup and shutdown procedures b. engine controls and operations c. autopilot controls and operations d. partially operation of the electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, fuel systems. Emulation of Proline 21 avionics suite. Currently there is only one layout that will allow you to operate the aircraft in all scenarios. Many improvements will come in the future. Installation in the 3D cockpit of the default X-Plane 11 FMC. Improved flight characteristics. Internal custom lighting. Of course Avanti development is not stopping here! Actually the overall development will be continuous, and the aircraft will always be in beta stage. Updates and upgrades will be available frequently! Main planned future upgrades are: Adding more functionallity to Proline 21 avionics suite, heading from an emulation to a simulation. Custom NAV maps. Custom FMC. Fully simulation of all systems. New 3D model from ground up. Improved flight model. Avanti EVO. Special thanks to: Austin Meyer for giving his permission to use parts of the Avanti on this project and X-Plane by Laminar Research that gave us this magnificent simulator! The team that originally developed Avanti for X-Plane, Robert Pearson (aerodynamics), Massimo Durando (cockpit & 3D cockpit), and Javier rollon (External Model. JRollonPlanes www.jrollon.com) for his fantastic 3D work. @Hueyman for the propeller 3D model and the prop disc images. Ben Russell of Gizmo64 for his support and that made available to us that powerful tool (aka Gizmo), and Cameron Son of X-Aviation for the support. And of course X-Plane community for the interest in that project and patient to wait to be realized!
  14. 8 points
    Hello All, This will serve as a formal forum announcement that we have released the version 1.0.8 update for the TBM 900. All customers who have purchased the TBM 900 up till now have been sent an e-mail by X-Aviation with complete instructions on how to obtain your update. We have made this a very simple process! For those that purchase the TBM 900 from today forward, your purchased download will already be updated to version 1.0.8 for you. What if I didn't get the update e-mail? If you did not receive your update e-mail don't fret! X-Aviation has updated our system to allow all customers to update with ease, regardless of whether you received an e-mail for the update! Here's what to do: 1. Login to your X-Aviation account here: https://www.x-aviation.com/catalog/account_history.php 2. Find your original TBM 900 download and re-download the file. It will download as the latest version! The following is a list of additions/fixes included: What's New / Changed: Very large poly reduction in cockpit. Cut another 50,000 polys off the model without loss of visual quality. Brake left/right hold commands were broken by axis logic rework. Put those back in. Implemented datarefs to show aerodynamic flight control loading, control position and neutral point. Flight control aerodynamic load was being incorrectly computed from instrument-indicated airspeed. Toe brake handling in partial axis assign situations is all wrong. Added thrust loading to flight control aerodynamic loading. Added notification about the MAN OVRD lever with engine shut down. Added notification about flooded combustor. Made exterior walkaround clickspots hidden when inside the cockpit. Added radar self-test sounds. Added new internal main door lock/unlock sounds. Turning off autopilot on XP11.30 caused a crash in yaw damper handling code. As always, thanks for being a customer with X-Aviation. We appreciate your feedback and support! Enjoy these latest updates, and stay tuned to the forum as we continually announce the latest happenings.
  15. 8 points
    and i'm loving every minute. The plane and its craftsmanship, both 3D modelling and programming are seriously on another level. This has set the new standard right across flight simulation...
  16. 7 points
    Folks, as promised, below is attached a CSL that's usable for showing other people's TBMs. Includes full animations on all flight controls, landing gear, lights. And it's PBRed to top it all off and highly framerate optimized. TBM900.zip
  17. 7 points
  18. 6 points
    We have a build in the works for tonight. Testers reporting performance improvements of between 25 and 50%. Seems I accidentally left some debug code in the builds that was slowing them down. Stay tuned for the next update, it should help quite a bit.
  19. 6 points
  20. 6 points
    Manual is done...at least the "beta" version. I'm going through it now, testing the checklists against proper functionality. My goal is to forward the package on to XA to begin distribution preparations by the weekend......this does NOT mean it will come out over the weekend.....distribution prep is quite a bit of work and takes some time. No update to 3D or sounds or any of that stuff in this version, just the engine model / prop locks for more accurate operation...and a few other tid-bits. As always, the fancy 3D / sounds are slated for the 2.0 release. -tkyler
  21. 5 points
    Hello All, This will serve as a formal forum announcement that we have released the version 1.0.6 update for the TBM 900. All customers who have purchased the TBM 900 up till now have been sent an e-mail by X-Aviation with complete instructions on how to obtain your update. We have made this a very simple process! For those that purchase the TBM 900 from today forward, your purchased download will already be updated to version 1.0.6 for you. What if I didn't get the update e-mail? If you did not receive your update e-mail don't fret! X-Aviation has updated our system to allow all customers to update with ease, regardless of whether you received an e-mail for the update! Here's what to do: 1. Login to your X-Aviation account here: https://www.x-aviation.com/catalog/account_history.php 2. Find your original TBM 900 download and re-download the file. It will download as the latest version! The following is a list of additions/fixes included: What's New / Changed: Fixed crossing mesh in front cabin Fixed occasional spotaneous "aircraft not activated" in flight Landing gear was being unnecessarily rendered in flight Added autopilot and yaw damper notification messages to avoid landing with them on Automatically hide the sidebar when taking screenshots. Screens weren't entirely black at night due to residual reflection simulation Fixed non-working charts on Mac due to missing 3rd party libraries Implemented new brake axis management system that allows simultaneous use of pedals and keyboard. Added option to disable low-FPS warning for custom effects Minor optimizations of mesh in cockpit (10,000 polys down) As always, thanks for being a customer with X-Aviation. We appreciate your feedback and support! Enjoy these latest updates, and stay tuned to the forum as we continually announce the latest happenings.
  22. 5 points
    Captains, Continuing on with our release date announcement series, today we are going to discuss maintenance wear and tear here, and seen in action on today's livestream happening at 6:30pm EST (2230 Zulu). You can watch the livestream by clicking here! (Previously Recorded) And now, let's talk about maintenance! While designing the TBM900 systems simulation, one our core areas of focus was on making a simulation that feels like you're caring for a real machine. And one of the things real machines require is maintenance. Now plenty of simulation vendors have implemented maintenance features. And quite often, in order to show it off, the programmers like to overdo it. I'm sure we can all share some stories of excessive plug fouling simulation. And because the effect is so pronounced, developers then need to make it an on-off option, so as not to annoy too many of their users. While fun at first, we feel this sort of approach mostly misses the goal of simulation: teaching. When the maintenance feature is overdone, it becomes overbearing, and users disable it. And when it's not there at all, users ignore it. In short, it becomes a gimmick. Instead, we want to give you the appreciation for what makes real aircraft tick. To that end, the TBM900's wear simulation features are NOT optional. They are always on. If you overstress the aircraft too much, it will reflect in accelerated component wear. For example, here we have a pilot who just inattentively shoved the throttle full forward on takeoff without considering the torque limit: How will this reflect on the aircraft model? Well initially not very terribly. When the aircraft was designed, it was designed with occasional mistakes in mind. The engine is equipped with a torque limiter, which will prevent catastrophic over-torquing of the engine. But over time, this will gradually build. How does this work in more detail? I'm afraid, we won't be able to avoid a graph here, but I will try to keep it informative. Here you can see how the aircraft roughly estimates component wear. For each component, we have a "stress factor" (which can actually be a number of inputs, such as temperature, torque, voltage, etc.). The more stress the component experiences, the faster the wear accumulates. This graph is very simple, in actual fact the system uses a much more complicated algorithm, but this should give you an idea. Treat your aircraft well, and it will carry you for a long time. But even if you mistreat it a little, it won't immediately combust. All of this then factors into our goal of showing you how the aircraft is put together. So when you bring up the maintenance manager, you will immediately notice that the aircraft not only has big blocks like "ENGINE". We break up each individual system into sub-components. Below you can see how the engine is built up: And yes, there are prices assigned to each service item. So each of the parts, assuming they are worn enough, you can either try to repair, or replace outright. Repairing is cheaper, but it may not get the aircraft up to fully a functional state. Replacing a component is more costly, but it restores full maintenance. The aircraft keeps track of everything you do in a maintenance log: I know you are dying to know the answer. Yes you can: Join us tonight on the livestream at the top of this post, and again tomorrow for a brief overlook of the custom graphical effects we've implemented for flight in less than ideal conditions! See you again soon!
  23. 5 points
    Probably at their homes where people normally go for time with their families at the end of a day. They visit here daily too.
  24. 5 points
    With the exterior of the TBM 900 all but completed, Cullen Chandler (Cessnarox on Twitch) provided feedback and specifications for a user friendly paint kit. He started painting the TBM a couple of days ago. Eventually, the paint kit and these repaints will be made available to the community. Here's a gallery of the first repaint he made. And these are his latest images.
  25. 5 points
    Hey John, sounds like the new prop lock feature got you. Its more realistic and you have the take the props off the locks before taxiing or you'll go nowhere fast I was wrong about the "linear interpolation".....the problem has been traced to my code fighting with Austin's code when a joystick is plugged in. Austin implemented a setting in plane-maker that is not accessible via dataref...and the setting should have been a joystick configuration setting, not a plane-maker constant. He acknowledged as much, but isn't ready to address it now. I'll have to go a level deeper into adjusting my "fuel controller" to compensate, until such time as he affects the change in the sim. Its a code-only change and will be available via hotfix. I'm working on it presently. -tkyler
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